Winter Seeds

This might be my least favorite time of year. The holidays, with their glittering lights and brightly colored packages, have passed. Here in Southwest Virginia, the sky is often gray, the air icy cold. We haven’t really had much snow so far to brighten things up, so we’re left with cold rains and fog.

I find myself longing for summer, dreaming of days where I sit on my patio, sipping my coffee in the morning sunshine and writing in my journal.

But I have to remind myself that these cold, wintry days are valuable too. The earth is sleeping, resting, and that is okay. That is part of the cycle of seasons. Yes, I might wish that I lived in southern California, where I could wear a tank top and sandals in January, but I can learn to appreciate the icy air and cold rains so prominent here this time of year.

Winter is the season of the wise crone, a season of rest, when dreams like seeds are sleeping in the frozen soil, waiting for spring to blossom.

There is something to appreciate in every season. Winter might be my least favorite, but it, too, has its lessons to share.

And in a few weeks will come Imbolc, a celebration of the promise of spring’s return, of days growing longer and the first signs of the earth awakening. It’s also the time of year when we honor the goddess Brighid, the face of the goddess to which I feel most connected.

So even in the gloom of winter, the promise of spring remains. We just need to remember, long after the evergreen boughs have been removed from the hearth, that even in winter, a season of rest and wisdom, the promise of spring remains.

ROW80 check-in:

Writing: Edited two chapters (no word count tracked) and wrote 4,868 words in A Prince in Patience Point. The manuscript started out at approximately 30K and is currently just under 37K. So, I’m close to novel length on this one.

Reading: Reading Thoroughly Kissed, a retelling of Sleeping Beauty by Kristine Grayson. Also started reading The Garden Witch’s Herbal by Ellen Dugan. Haven’t read any writing books yet.

Social media: Started the week off strong but haven’t been doing this as regularly as I should.

Exercise: Did yoga one out of three times this week. So, kind of a fail, but that happens.

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. Click here to cheer on fellow participants.

What about you? What does winter symbolize to you?

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12 thoughts on “Winter Seeds

  1. The thing I like about winter is I have an excuse to stay indoors and just read, write, play computer games, do some website work… all things I like to do (and are sometimes for money), but I have a hard time focusing on or feel guilty about doing when it’s nice outside. So yeah, winter is time to catch up on those things. Good progress, and keep it up!

  2. Winter, to me, symbolizes somber times. It’s a good time to cozy up with a warm meal. I usually don’t do much writing, but I’m hoping to change that. I would like to have a story set in winter. My favorite moments of winter is when it’s dusk and snow is falling. The sky turns an unusual color. It’s like a dark lavender. I think that’s a perfect setting for a mystery or something intriguing to happen.

    • There is something very solemn about this season, isn’t there? I feel like winter is a season of quiet reflection, a time that incubates not only seeds but also future dreams.

      A snowy sunset is beautiful. I think the image you’ve mentioned would make a great writing prompt. You should try it and see where it leads!

  3. When winter is dreary, it seems to linger. Yet, since I now live in the Sonoran Desert, I appreciate the season since the unbearable heat of summer seems endless until someone finally turns down the thermostat. So enjoy this time Denise. Make some soup, curl up next to the fire, immerse yourself in a lovely book while sipping your favorite tea, cuddle with your hubby, ponder over your next story, embrace the simple quietude of the leaveless sky. 🙂

    • Yes, I guess the downside to living somewhere with warmer winters is that summers are often, as you mentioned, unbearably hot. There are few, if any, places that offer the best of both. Every winter I complain about the cold and consider moving somewhere with milder winters, but in summer, Southwest Virginia is so absolutely beautiful that it’s hard to imagine leaving.

      Ah, I’d love to have a fireplace or even a wood-burning stove. Maybe in the next place we live! In the meantime, I think I’ll take your advice and curl up with a cup of Earl Grey tea and a good book.

      Thanks, Karen! Take care and happy writing. 🙂

  4. For us, it’s a time of quasi-hibernation, cocooning and growing largely unseen by the outside world. My children get taller, their minds more mature and sophsiticated. I often turn inward, listening and feeling the stories stirring in their sleep, stretching, breaking the surface like those fist crocuses…I work on my blog layout,organize things in our home, and prepare in many ways for the warmer and more outwardly-focused seasons to come.

    I used to dislike winter – now I see it as a welcome respite, inviting me to linger here, where I am most beloved, where my most beloved are…

    • I’m coming to see it as a season of slumber, one that incubates future dreams, like sleeping seeds–thus the title of the article. There’s a chance hubby and I might move north in a few years, and I know winters will only be colder and harsher. We can find some comfort in brewing a pot of tea and curling up with a good book. I’m learning to see the beauty in every season. 🙂

      • It’s cold tonight. We’ve got a cozy fire, and I’ve got my Accomplice to snuggle up with, and a cat who likes to be up against my feet.

        That said, we’re planning a move to Oregon. =D

      • Sounds wonderful! Good luck with your move to Oregon. It seems so beautiful out there. Hubby and I have talked about moving there one day, but right now he’s in grad school, so we’re staying put for a few years. 🙂

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