Midweek ROW80 check-in

One of the things I’ve struggled with in the past is transitioning between projects. One day the words will be flying onto the page as fast as my fingers can type, and then I’ll type “the end” on a story.

And the next day, I’ll be stuck facing a blank page for a new story, or trying to reconnect with characters in an existing manuscript so I can revise.

I think I’m getting better at it. Like many things, practice helps. Daily word count goals help. Self-imposed deadlines help.

Yesterday I finished a short story, and after I’ve proofread it and sent it off to my critique partners, it will be time to start something new. I’m thinking of expanding another short story to novella length. The two main characters in the story are minor characters in an earlier story, and beta readers really seem to like them and want to read more about them. I hope to start that later this week.

Hopefully practice pays off and the transition between projects is smoother.

Midweek ROW80 check-in…

Writing: So far this week I’ve written 3,186 words and finished my short story. Still working on a title, but it’s currently called “Into the Faerie Forest.” This is the second title, but I’m still not sure it works. We’ll see what my critique partners think.

Reading: Finished reading Corsets and Clockwork, a short story collection. I would recommend it to fans of steampunk. There are some really good stories in this collection.

Decluttering: Good news. Hubby is now on board with my quest to get rid of five things a day. He’s offered to contribute two of the five. I’m not sure we’ll last the entire 100 days, but we’ll see how far we get.

A Round of Words in 80 Days is the writing challenge that knows you have a life. Click here to cheer on fellow participants.

How are your goals coming along? Do you ever struggle with transitioning between projects? What helps you in this process?

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10 thoughts on “Midweek ROW80 check-in

  1. I struggle with transitioning to different projects. There are times when I leave a story unfinished just to start a new one. It was really bad writing out my stories with pen and paper. I can’t begin to count how many drafts I have of the same story. I think the reason why is because I get easily bored with a story. Right now, I’m working on my “Cell Games” stories, but I feel like I’m in a stall. The characters are not as engaging as I would like. Or maybe it’s because the stories aren’t as engaging. I’m not sure. I’ll have to talk with my CP.

    Unfortunately, I don’t have any methods of combatting this issue. I try to push myself to finish one project at a time. Like right now, I’m in the middle of my second “Cell Games” story. I skipped a part of the story because I couldn’t come up with something that wouldn’t sound boring. I’m still brainstorming ideas. But when I’m done, I’ll email my CP and have her look at it. While she’s looking at it, I will start something else to not think about it so much. I may start a new story altogether. I don’t know yet.

      • I’m good at finishing first drafts. Second drafts…well, not so much, but I’m improving. I tend to finish a draft and let it sit a while. Maybe too long. I’m working on that.

    • The worst is when a story just stalls. You show up at the page every day, and nothing. I sometimes have trouble focusing, bouncing from one project to the next. I’m trying to change my ways and really focus on a story until it’s publishable quality. And that takes a while. But I’m getting better at switching between projects. It’s still hard, though.

  2. I totally have a problem transitioning. I’ll even use it as an excuse to procrastinate. When I finish a writing project I like to let it rest before I pick it back up and give it a first read. I should use the down time to start another project, instead I blow it on something useless. Like Pinterest!

    • My husband and I were just discussing this meme I found online a while back. It said “Procrastinators unite…tomorrow.” That pretty much sums it up.

      Like you, I need to let a project sit–at least a month, preferably six weeks–before I’m ready to view it with fresh eyes. I have found that using that time to work on something else has an added bonus. Because I’ve been wrapped up in another story, I have more distance from the previous one, so I’m able to be more objective when I do a read-through.

      Ah, Pinterest. What a wonderful place to lose track of time… 🙂

  3. I have a bigger problem than transitioning: not choosing something to write in the first place. In the past year, I’ve sketched out ideas for no less than 5 books, but haven’t actually started any of them. Joining Row80 for the first time this month and having those 80-day goals, and doing the Lifetime Goals exercise in Rise of the Machines (Kristen Lamb), has really focused me.

    • The accountability of ROW80 often pushes me to write just a little more, or to show up at the page when I would rather have a “Murder, She Wrote” marathon. I know I have to share my word counts on my blog, and that is a great motivator.

      Sometimes I think fear or self-doubt can block us from moving forward with our stories. Maybe there’s something psychological holding you back? I recommend “The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron.

      And I hope you’re enjoying Kristen’s book as much as I did!

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